1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Tutorial How to stripp paint

Discussion in 'Painting and Converting' started by Taltopec, May 9, 2021.

  1. Taltopec
    Skink

    Taltopec Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    74
    Trophy Points:
    13
    Hello! Do any of you have some good advice on how to stripp paint from old plastic and metal models?
     
  2. Lord-Marcus
    Slann

    Lord-Marcus Sixth Spawning

    Messages:
    6,558
    Likes Received:
    8,475
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I can assist in this regard.

    1. what type of plastic models. reaper bones for instance you need a completely different chemical vs sprue polystyrene.

    2. metal models are exceptionally easy.


    for metal models, as well as most polystyrene sprues such as those you get from games workshop, you are going to want a container (I use old chinese takeout soup containers) and a solvent.

    Different solvents work, so you really want to get what is available.

    If you have a dollar tree nearby, this is your one stop. You are going to need L.A.'s Totally Awesome degreaser. yes thats the brand name apparently.

    yellow liquid. they sell two sizes, a 24 ounce with a spray top, and a 32 ounce refill bottle. Just buy the refills as you're pouring it into the container anyway.

    while you are there pick up a cheap pack of manual tooth brushes.

    Metal models that sit in L.A.'s for about 8 hours are ready to be cleaned. Warm water and scrub with earlier mentioned tooth brushes.

    plastic i would let sit for 48 hours, scrub, then potentially 48 hours again if it doesn't loosen all the paint.

    let your miniatures dry then you are good to base, prime, and re-paint.
     
  3. WildColonial Boy
    Razordon

    WildColonial Boy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    350
    Likes Received:
    913
    Trophy Points:
    93
    With plastic miniatures use a test subject in the solution first. Sometimes the miniature will melt and/or lose detail. Sometimes it will also dissolve the glue that is holding any of the parts together.
    It very much depends on the type of plastic miniatures and what solvent you use.
     
    Noxolotl and Taltopec like this.
  4. Taltopec
    Skink

    Taltopec Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    74
    Trophy Points:
    13
    Awesome thanks! So a standard degrease solvent would work? Being from Norway I don't think we have the same brands....
    It's mostly old he plastic the one lighter than their current plastic.
    I think I'll try with a test model first as WildColonial Boy suggested and see what happens
     
    Noxolotl and Imrahil like this.
  5. Lord-Marcus
    Slann

    Lord-Marcus Sixth Spawning

    Messages:
    6,558
    Likes Received:
    8,475
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I can inquire as to brands available in Norway
     
    Taltopec likes this.
  6. Taltopec
    Skink

    Taltopec Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    74
    Trophy Points:
    13
    Please do that would be awesome!!:D
     
  7. Gauntlet
    Saurus

    Gauntlet Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    312
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Oh by the way, I see no-one has mentioned a "jewlry cleaner" AKA a Ultrasonic Cleaner.

    These use cavitation to assist cleaning products. I personally bought this one and have been very pleased in it's overall size and capacity at stripping paint:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B072JXQ9P5/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    But if you are only occasionally stripping infantry, there are plenty of options in the 40USD range. Regardless, these are extremely useful for helping strip paint, clean airbrushes, and cleanse models of residue (key step in resin 3d printing).
     
    Noxolotl likes this.
  8. ChapterAquila92
    Skink Chief

    ChapterAquila92 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,805
    Likes Received:
    5,529
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I would also like to add isopropyl alcohol - the kind you can find on pharmacy shelves - to the list of effective paint thinners/strippers. I've used it in the past to clean metal models, airbrush parts and brushes (my father also found windshield washer fluid to be just as useful, if not as harsh a cleaner), and to thin down acrylic Tamiya paints for airbrush use. I'll have to test on a spare plastic model at some point, but it works wonders on the old metal ones after a few soaks and some scrubbing with a spare toothbrush.
     
    Noxolotl and Imrahil like this.

Share This Page